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Music Lessons Spur Emotional and Behavioral Growth in Children, Study says

Friday, February 16, 2018 by Mary O'Connor | lessons

From the Washington Post, but we knew this already, right?



Music training not only helps children develop fine motor skills, but aids emotional and behavioral maturation as well, according to a new study, one of the largest to investigate the effects of playing an instrument on brain development.

Using a database produced by the National Institutes of Health Magnetic Resonance (MRI) Study of Normal Brain Development, researchers at the University of Vermont College of Medicine analyzed the brain scans of 232 healthy children ages six to 18 specifically looking at brain development in children who play a musical instrument. (The original study did not indicate specific instruments.)

"What we found was the more a child trained on an instrument," said James Hudziak, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont and director of the Vermont Center for Children, Youth and Families, "it accelerated cortical organization in attention skill, anxiety management and emotional control."

Read the entire article at Music lessons spur emotional and behavioral growth in children, new study says - The Washington Post.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 by Mary O'Connor | holiday

Valentines-Day




valentine-stomp

Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller (May 21, 1904 – December 15, 1943) was an influential American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer, whose innovations to the Harlem stride style laid the groundwork for modern jazz piano.  He wrote the Valentine Stomp above in 1929.

MaryOOneRose

“If You’re Learning Piano, You Don’t Give Up Because You Miss a Note”

Sunday, February 11, 2018 by Mary O'Connor | quotes


I have a copy of this music (Faerie's Aire and Death Waltz) if anyone is interested in playing it!

 

 

The music above has been played:



The drive you need to accomplish whatever you're attempting—big or small—needs fuel. Instead of letting slip-ups set you back, psychologist and author John Norcross recommends you make them the fuel:

"If you are learning to play the piano, you don't give up because you miss a note. It's not whether you slip, it's how you respond to the slip."

Cut yourself some slack and remember that things take time and hard work. Listen to the sound of your "missed note" and let that push you forward. You missed that note yesterday, but that doesn't mean you'll miss it today.

via "If You're Learning Piano, You Don't Give Up Because You Miss a Note".