Keep Up-To-Date with the Student/Parent Portal

  Tuesday, August 22, 2017 by Mary O'Connor | parents

student-parent-portal-login



The O'Connor Music Studio features fully functional parent/student portals. These are a great way to share information with you, save time, and add value to your lessons.

The student portal provides you with:

  • Student’s calendar with upcoming lessons and events
  • Student’s repertoire
  • Student’s practice log
  • Family’s account and invoice information (only visible to parents/adult students)
  • Access to your download library and a list of borrowed items
  • View student's attendance
  • Track student's practice time and leave notes or questions from the practice session
  • Add and track their repertoires
  • View their email history
  • View Mrs. O'Connor's contact information
  • Keep up-to-date with studio news

Students can also join and cancel lessons based on the OCMS studio cancellation policy.

Using the student portal is completely optional, but highly recommended.

How do I join the Student Portal?
 
To join the student portal your teacher will send you your login information. Once received you will be able to access the student portal and all of its features.

How do I cancel a Lesson?
 
To cancel a scheduled lesson simply click on the lesson or event in your calendar and click “Cancel Attendance”. You can optionally leave your teacher a note about why you are canceling in the provided “Note to Teacher” dialogue box.

How do I register for an Open Lesson Slot?
 
To register for an Open Lesson Slot click on the event or lesson on the calendar as select “Register”. A dialogue box will appear asking you if you “are you sure you want to register for this Open Slot?” Click “Yes”. If the lesson or event you are trying to register for is a recurring event, choose the dates you would like to attend.

Check your email for information about logging in!

June 20 ~ Daily Listening Assignment

Wednesday, June 20, 2018 by Mary O'Connor | OCMS

 

Today's piece is one of those that piano students often try to learn on their own - or a friend will teach them the first 9 notes.  It's usually played too fast and, often in the wrong octave, or the first couple notes are repeated too many times. 

This is one of two pieces that are so often played incorrectly that they have the distinction of being banned from competition in Northern Virginia Piano Teacher competitions.

Stay tuned for the other one!

Fur Elise was not published during Beethoven's lifetime, having been discovered by Ludwig Nohl 40 years after the composer's death. The identity of "Elise" is unknown.

The very basic melody:

 



 

The actual beginning is a little more involved.

 

And, there's more!

 

If you'd like to learn to play this piece correctly, find the sheet music at IMSLP, Beethoven: Exploring His Life and Music, and countless compilations of classical music available at the O'Connor Music Studio.


Follow along:


By Valentina Lisitsa:

Ragtime!


A variety of instruments (Piano, Guitar, Cat Piano, Cello, Launchpad, Ukulele)


The Big Piano at FAO Schwartz in NYC:


Glass harp:



Youtube has many, many more versions.  Beethoven would probably go nuts!

June 19 ~ Daily Listening Assignment

Tuesday, June 19, 2018 by Mary O'Connor | OCMS

 

The Magic Flute' (German name: Die Zauberflöte) is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's final opera, and it contains one of the most well-known arias in music. But what is 'The Magic Flute' all about?



 

An animated version:



Played as a piano/organ duo:



 

Arranged by Ferruccio Busoni for 2 pianos:



 

Why Mozart's Magic Flute is a masterpiece - an introduction (The Royal Opera)



 

The accordion version:



Find this in Piano Pronto: Movement 3, Encore, Mozart: Exploring His Life and Music



June 18 ~ Daily Listening Assignment

Monday, June 18, 2018 by Mary O'Connor | OCMS

 

 

Today's assignment is a very popular piece by Johann Pachelbel called Canon in D.

A canon is a technique that employs a melody with one or more imitations of the melody played after a given duration (e.g., quarter rest, one measure, etc.). The initial melody is called the leader, while the imitative melody, which is played in a different voice, is called the follower. The follower must imitate the leader, either as an exact replication of its rhythms and intervals or some transformation thereof. Repeating canons in which all voices are musically identical are called rounds—"Row, Row, Row Your Boat" and "Frère Jacques" are popular examples.

The original version:

 


 

Can you see why the cellist is bored?




Here's what his music looks like

And that repeats over and over for the whole piece!

A bit of humor from a past cellist:


Variations on the theme:


 

Find it in Piano Pronto Finale and Coda